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  • 2011 September 15
    From the daily archives: Thursday, September 15, 2011

    As October approaches, we will see a parade of pink ribbons, gathering momentum throughout the month. Lots of inspiring stories, donation campaigns, pink labels on the things you buy all the time.

    And lots of businesses will make lots of money, courting your business for “the cause” and donating “a percentage” to the breast cancer cause.

    I hate pink ribbons! I hate them and I wear them. When I was in chemotherapy they made me feel supported. Now I see them on cereal boxes, cat litter, you name it. Blech.

    When I was diagnosed in 2007, I was under the impression that breast cancer was a disease that had been mostly conquered. I had heard all about early detection, better treatments, etc. etc. etc.

    What? Stage III? Inflammatory Breast Cancer (survival rate: 20-40%) Really?

    Do you know what really happens when a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer?

    Regardless of what stage her disease is, she has a one in three chance of it coming back as metastatic disease.

    Breast Cancer kills, folks. It kills 150,000 people this year.

    My friend Kathleen has posted about how the media, especially women’s magazines, support our complacency with erroneous drivel disguised as facts.

    Why is this pinkwashing going on?

    Well, all the folks who make money with your purchases would like us to believe we are winning the battle against breast cancer, so we can feel like we are doing something. If we feel that we can do something (because we are good citizens of course) easily by buying this or that pinkwashed product, then everybody from toilet paper manufacturers to water providers can cash in on increased sales from which a tiny percentage they make their token donation.

    The Pink Crusade has a very dark underbelly. Those of us who have been through the hell of what real breast cancer is steel ourselves for the sweetness and light of Breast Cancer Awareness Month that is a figment of the collective imagination.

    The battle looks very much as it has for decades.

    We’ve made strides. But we have won skirmishes, not the battle.

    Too many women and men still die. Too many are now living with metastatic disease, subjecting themselves to treatments that make them sick to get some more time. Who among us wants to leave before we are ready?

    What would you do if you were running out of time and you weren’t done yet? What drugs wouldn’t you try?

    If you were sick with chemotherapy or compromising your quality of life for more time, or losing the use of your arms, back, or brain to cancer that just keeps marching on, what the hell would you be saying about the Pink drive for dollars, and the commercialism of breast cancer?

    So what can we do?

    1. Research before you buy. Don’t just buy because there’s a pink ribbon on the box. Bookmark Think Before You Pink and take action.

    2. Join Army of Women. Be a part of the search for the CURE, not more mammograms or salaries for CEO’s of nonprofits. Those are important, but the cure is the most important. I am thankful for mammograms but my cancer did not show up on a mammogram, and I am not alone (that’s not what you heard, is it?). I will be ecstatic when I know my daughter can grow up without fear.

    3. Get behind Deadline 2020.

    4. Donate directly to legitimate breast cancer charities. Fund raise if you like, but make sure that you know exactly where the proceeds are going.

    I would like to rename Breast Cancer Awareness Month to Face Reality Month. Anybody with me?

    I just added another post on this topic at Everyday Health. Let’s take back October!

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