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    Wow.  Hard to believe my last post was over a year ago!  This place must look like a ghost town.  Where does the time go?

    I have an interesting job these days, that I’ve been getting used to for the last six months.  It has created a very interesting perspective on my cancer experience!  What I do is screen massage therapists for an on-demand massage network.  I work for Soothe, interviewing therapists and accepting them into the network (or not).  The part that’s taking some getting used to is that the job includes receiving 30 minute practicals from candidates.

    Sure, it’s great to get massages every day I go to work.  It’s fabulous!  My office mates tease me about my tough job, lol.

    What I didn’t think about was how it would be explaining my contraindications at sometimes three times a day, up to ten times a week.

    Before I can proceed with having a therapist give me a massage, I have to tell her about my lymphedema, the tight fascia on my left side, and the neuropathy on my feet.  At first it felt a little weird.  Now I’m used to it. It takes the edge off after you say it enough times.

    I am 5’7″, have blue eyes, spend more time at a computer than I’m used to, and I have lymphedema.  Oh, and there’s no breast there on the left.  And the sky is blue.

    Technically, I still have breast cancer, and I’m in remission.  To me, I had breast cancer.  Once I had cancer that I could see and feel, I could watch it shrink, and after surgery I could joyfully believe it was gone.  NED, no evidence of disease, means that chances are good that it’s gone.  It’s been eight years now.  If I don’t think it’s gone, and that I had (past tense) inflammatory breast cancer, I could go crazy with worry and not live my life.

    I recently started downloading and editing the Caringbridge journals that I kept while I was going through it.  Soon I found myself drawn in, even though I’m just mostly downloading.  One night after getting lost in the journals, I became fixated on the risk of late recurrence and kept myself up all night noodling on the internet and worrying.

    It’s always there.  It’s probably good to just relegate it into another fact I recite to a massage therapist so I get a great massage.

    I feel a bit sheepish for staying away from here so long!  For every woman out there who’s just been diagnosed, I’m still here.  I’ll try to be here in my cyber room a little more often.

    Blessings,

    Elizabeth

     

    Today my daughter and my husband are on stage, while I am at work. They are in eTc’s production of HONK, which is a musical version of the Ugly Duckling story. My mom, my son and I are going to see the show on Saturday, which will be the last performance. I chaperoned last weekend, which meant chasing down little children and getting them into their costumes.

    I snuck out into the audience to watch my daughter in her big scene, and I was so proud! Her performance was polished, engaging, spot-on. Impressive even to a theatrical perfectionist like me. I heard similar feedback from others.

    I didn’t have a clue. She never practiced in front of me. Her comedic timing, her flawless British accent, and sweet right on pitch harmonies were a complete surprise to me.

    I wonder who it matters more for, me or her, that I was here to see it and be so proud? Probably her.

    If I had left the planet in 2007 or 2008, maybe I would have seen, but I wouldn’t have been able to tell her how proud I was of her. Because I am here, she knows.

    I feel truly blessed today.

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    I’ve been pondering the meaning of Right Livelihood, because I have been gleefully absorbed in it.

    I come home from a day’s work wiped out, but satisfied. I had the thought recently that if I were to suddenly have a windfall I wouldn’t really change much. I’d probably take more vacations and spoil my children a little more. I wouldn’t mind owning my home instead of renting it. I’d do a few more musicals. But when it comes to what I do every day? I wouldn’t change a thing.

    I have added more time at the hospital, now working on another campus providing massage to children who are receiving chemotherapy. I adore these kids. The job is a dream. All the kids are in close proximity to each other so I don’t have to wander far and wide to see them.

    I love my own lil’ stinkers, who put gray hair on my head and drive me nuts. My son calls me “Your Motherness” and asks, “can I help you?” when I appear dismayed, usually because he is blowing off his homework or his room should be condemned.

    My daughter has a new title for me, and it’s usually loud.

    “Madration!”

    Usually my taxi services are required. Currently my dear husband is taking on some of that, since he and Miss Peach are doing a musical together. I being part of the fun but I have made use of the quiet weekends. Maybe the next one.

    When I get in my groove at home writing or doing something else, I don’t usually feel enthused about interrupting to go teach drama to the kids at the local elementary school, but when I get there they swarm me. Then they make me laugh. What could be better?

    What I do isn’t everybody’s thing, but it’s mine. I spend my days making a difference for children, and some grownups too. My private massage practice is growing and it is joy to be cause for someone having their brain work properly because they are free of pain pills.

    Some days break my heart. Seeing a child deteriorate over a period of months is painful. Being able to ease his pain is unspeakably sweet.

    Other times I can only laugh. The best compliment I have ever received was from a 16 year old kid at the hospital, there because of a freak accident. When I gave him the feedback form to fill out, he handed it to his mom and said,

    “She has the most RIGHTEOUSLY exTRAVAGANT hands EVER!”

    I do a lot of energy work in the pediatric unit. I was thrown for a loop on Thursday when a thoughtful young rascal receiving chemotherapy said to me,

    “All the nurses have cold hands. Why are yours hot?” I told him that my hands knew that they were touching people so they knew they were supposed to get warm. I told him that when I’ve been at the computer they get cold. This is actually true.

    There’s an awful lot of pressure in this world to be obsessed with discontent. There’s always something more to want. Our whole culture is built around wanting more, and look what a mess we’re in! Not only does the economy stink, but so many of us are unhappy.

    James Taylor had the right idea. In one of his songs, he says:

    The secret of life is enjoying the passage of time.  Anyone can do it, there’s nothing to it!”

    A grand concept in a simple little package.

    What am I enjoying right now?  An achy 50 year old body that worked hard today and drove too far. My eyes are tired from dealing with contact lenses, which my twelve year old daughter has mastered effortlessly.  I’d love to go to bed but I’d better stretch first or I’ll wake up tied in knots.

    I’m entering into a period of milestones.  The five year anniversary of my diagnosis.  In June, the five year anniversary of my last major chemotherapy and the beginning of the return of hair.  In October, five years from my last radiation treatment.  Next May, the five year anniversary of my last Herceptin infusion.

    Right now I’m creaky, tired, sometimes grumpy, often amused, beleaguered by teenagers and tearing my hair out while celebrating how long it is, left arm a little heavy but oh well, wishing my son would do his homework…..etc……

    and I’m still here and enjoying the hell out of the ride.

     

     

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    Well, one teen and one pre-teen. She’ll be 13 in August and she’s practicing.

    This morning I was appreciating that I didn’t have to rush so much, not the way I did in the pre-cancer days. I would, like so many parents, get myself ready for work and get my offspring ready for school, then race out the door for a busy day and not get home until the day was done. I have it set up differently now.

    They get me up. I make coffee for me and tea for them, and see that they are well fed. I pack her a lunch and give him lunch money, which is how they like it. I enjoy my coffee with them, and then I take him to high school and her to middle school. Sometimes the journey is friendly, sometimes not, usually amusing if my sense of humor is intact (sleep?). I get home and leisurely prepare to work. I either prepare to see a massage client, do some writing, or work on theater stuff for the drama club at the elementary school. It’s lovely. I am tickled to report that as of today I have replaced all the income I will lose next month when my disability expires. I have added four hours per week at the children’s hospital, and I am getting some new clients. How can I not believe in a benevolent universe?

    This morning was hilarious. My daughter, the great leaver of messes and trasher of the car, was berating me for a banana peel that I had left in a Starbuck’s cup that I then threw away. An exchange ensued, wherein she was reminded by her brother and me that she uses the back seat for her own private closet. As the volume and irritation began to crescendo, my son began singing “love is in the air” plaintively. After we dropped him off, my other child leaped over the seat into the front. It would not do to arrive at Middle School being visible in the back seat!

    When we arrived, she announced that she was going to “chill” for a moment. I stopped the engine, and she applied lip balm, sent a couple of texts, and enjoyed her favorite tween song (boring) on the radio. Then with a great flourish she exited the vehicle, it seemed to me to greet her fans.

    I sat there for a moment and thought, I could have missed this. I wouldn’t have even known what I was missing.

    I thought of my friend Susan, who had to leave her babies while they were in kindergarten. Sometimes life is unbearably cruel, even in a benevolent universe.

    Today, if the rain gives us a break, some 2nd and 3rd graders, 4th and 5th graders, the choreographer and I will dedicate a school garden.

    Life is ever so sweet today.

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