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    You may have noticed my new icon to the right, the link to Army of Women. This organization is the brainchild of Avon and Dr. Susan Love, and it’s purpose is to end breast cancer by learning how it starts in the first place.

    This is a question researchers have been asking, but finding people to participate has been the main obstacle. To find out the answers, researchers need no less than an army!

    If you have never had breast cancer, you are needed. If your mother, sister, grandmother, or any other close relatives have had breast cancer, you are needed. If you are fighting it you are needed. If you are a survivor, you are needed!

    We are all needed. Women, men (yes, men!) survivors and everyone else, the research that will answer the question will take an army.

    If you join the Army of Women, you will be invited to participate in research, but are in no way obligated. Being part of the Army of Women means that you stay up to date on what’s happening in the research world. You can be part of it at whatever level you want to be.

    I’ve joined the Army of Women. I’ve joined it without hesitation, for my sister, my friends, my mom, so many women and men that I love. Most of all I joined for my beautiful 11 year old daughter, Felicia. I am imagining a world where she can grow up free of the fear of breast cancer.

    For more information, click on the purple Army of Women link on the right. Please join us! You are needed!

    As I have become more and more overwhelmed by what I want to do and more serious about it, I have been noodling all over cyberspace.  What I have discovered is that there are tons of wonderful resources out there!  The trick is finding them.

    What I do is go to a blog I like, then go to a blog she likes, and another, and so on.  It’s a wide world in cyberland, and a wonderful community of serious bloggers who are giving hope, educating, and dealing with cancer with courage and grace.  Today I found Being Cancer Network.  The blog was conceived by a two time survivor who beat the odds, and is now facilitating a blogger network to help people cope with any diagnosis.

    What I am finding is that there is a vast, amazing flow of information and inspiration going on, and all the ideas I have floating in my head about what will be helpful are already being implemented!  That is just SO amazing and fantastic.

    My vision of this site is expanding and coming into focus.  All of this great stuff I’m finding will be traceable from here!

    I found Survivor Profiles.  I’m sure I will add some of my own, but there are some already out there that I can link to.

    The blog network is inspired.  I didn’t think of that one at all!  What a great resource!

    I would like to profile supporters as well, or find supporter profiles so that people who are walking with a loved one on the cancer journey can find wisdom and support as well.

    I think that the most important thing I have learned, that I feel is hugely important to my thriving into the future, is that passion is life force.  I have had many occupations, both paid and unpaid, that mattered to me.  When I was a single mom with a huge responsibility to (in my mind) sacrifice creative passion to practicality, I failed to thrive.  With lack of passion, and with constant, relentless stress, my body was too depleted to fight the beast when it invaded.

    Today, the day after Thanksgiving, I enjoyed time with my daughter, her friend and her friend’s dad.  We saw “Tangled” which was just delicious!  I enjoyed it immensely, and when I got home I happily greeted my computer, ready to roam around looking for good stuff, and ready to talk about it.

    All work and no play is no fun and not good for anyone.

    The perfect work is the one I’m glad to leave play to come home and do!

    If any of you, my readers, discover another gem, please tell me!  I can’t wait to post about it right here.

    I secured my first Thriver story today.  My wonderful postman, Douglas, has agreed to tell me his story so I can post it as my first Thriver Profile.  My plan is to present these profiles of real people beating cancer on a regular basis, around once every two weeks for awhile.  I have at least twenty people on my list!

    Douglas and I were talking today about what a morass the internet is when you’re newly diagnosed.  There is so much information, and a lot of it is very valuable.  Some of it is contradictory.  Some of it is outdated and scary.  I suspect a lot of us, like my friend Douglas, will flail around out there for a couple of weeks and then “just put it away”.

    I want to offer something different here.  For every cancer, there is somebody who has prevailed against it, and it is those people that cancer patients need to know about!  If you’ve just been diagnosed with colon cancer, Douglas’s story will give you hope.  If you’ve been diagnosed with Inflammatory Breast Cancer, read my story and take heart, because that is why I tell it.  If you are facing Ovarian Cancer, then you can be uplifted by my Aunt Joan’s story and my freind Avis’s story, if they will let me tell them.  I haven’t asked yet!  :)  These two amazing women have both conquered two separate cancer diagnoses.

    I know people who have faced and prevailed against colon cancer, throat cancer, Lymphoma, and Triple Negative Breast Cancer. I know people who were diagnosed at Stage Four and today are cancer free.  I also know people who are in remission and going about their lives, coexisting peaceably with their metastatic cancer. A friend of mine has a brother who has survived over 15 years after a belated diagnosis of Breast Cancer.  All of these people are on my list, and if they say yes, you will read their stories.

    As this site develops, I am getting a clearer and clearer idea of what I want it to be.  This is a place to find tools you can get your hands on with great strength, tools and inspiration to keep your chin up.  Sometimes keeping your chin up is the most important, and maybe the only thing you can really do today.  I’ve had plenty of days like that!

    You don’t have to have cancer in your present, future or history to welcome a boost of some kind.  I hope anyone who wants one can find it here.

    Second thing:  I need to adjust my tagline.  I don’t want just “resources for during and after cancer”.  What can I add to this line that expresses what I’m really doing here?

    Please, comment away, I need your input!

    P.S.  Are you seeing popups on this page?  I you are, I am going to kick some —.  I hate popups and I am getting them on my admin page.  Please let me know!

    P.P.S.  I just updated “my story” with photos.  It’s kind of a long story….

    Have you or someone you know been diagnosed with Inflammatory Breast Cancer?

    Maybe you have been researching, and have found some pretty scary stuff on the internet.  Perhaps you are more worried than you were when started looking, because those statistics are pretty alarming, and if you read “rare, aggressive and deadly” one more time you’re going to punch somebody. What good news could there possibly be?

    Actually, a lot.  Most importantly, that it is survivable, and those dire statistics are anywhere from two to five years old.  A lot has changed in the world of IBC, and Planet Cancer in general.  Many of the articles you may have seen online were written several years ago.  Sometimes the information presented is just plain inaccurate.

    Is IBC scary?  Yes.  It is rare, about one to five out of a hundred breast cancers.  It is aggressive, but so are the treatments used to fight it.  Deadly?  It can be, if it’s not diagnosed properly.  There’s no doubt it’s a nasty cancer, and it does kill. And, many times, it does not.  I am an Inflammatory Breast Cancer survivor, and I know of several others.  There are twenty year plus survivors out there.

    When survival rates enter the dialogue, five years is the usual measure.  This means that people who were treated even three years ago don’t factor into those figures.  When I was treated for IBC in 2007, huge strides had been made in treating my disease within the previous two years.

    First, let me clear up some misinformation I’ve found out there.  IBC is not always diagnosed at Stage 4.  It is never diagnosed at Stage 1 or 2, because the aggressive nature of the beast is that by the time you know it’s there it’s at Stage 3 or more.  That may sound scary, and it is.  But Stage 3 holds the possibility of emerging on the other side of it cancer free.  Stage 4 breast cancer isn’t even what it used to be.  People beat that too.  Those stories don’t get much press, unfortunately.  IBC is not “a new kind of breast cancer” either.  It has been around for decades, just missed a lot until some savvy doctors picked it up on the radar.

    People survive this disease more and more because a lot has been learned about it, new drugs are being developed, and the treatment protocol is somewhat different now than for other breast cancers.  It’s a tough protocol, but I rode that wave and you can too.  I’ll address ways to do that in another post soon.

    There are long term Stage 4 survivors around as well.  I have a friend I met in the “chemo salon” three years ago who had been surviving for two years when I met her.  She’s still there, three years later, getting her weekly herceptin (thank you Genentech!) and still having her life.

    So, the gloom and doom is old news.  The good news is that there are more and better treatments than ever before for facing down Inflammatory Breast Cancer, and we survivors are legion.

    Hang in there!

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